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Archive for the ‘Construction’ Category

Temporary Fence; Providing Job Site or Event Safety and Control

March 1, 2012 6 comments

Temporary Fencing:
If you haven’t thought about using it, how it can be a benefit to you or your company or even not sure what it is, let The Backfill try to clear the muddy water for you.

Portable fencing is a sturdy affordable asset that can be used in many applications from complying with building and safety codes on construction sites to crowd control.  In some areas a fencing perimeter is required by law around project sites. Temporary fencing can also help prevent theft and outside injury while providing overall control and safety for construction sites, special events or home renovations.

Adapts To You:
Fencing is versatile in installation, configuration and set up locations. Whether you site is on a hard surface, such as concrete, where stands are used or softer surface, such as grass, and an in-ground installation can be used; temporary fencing can be erected to fit your sites requirements.

Purchasing or building fence is costly and time-consuming. When you add in the volume of pieces and its space requirements, storing it is a hassle and can be costly, which is just not feasible. This is where rental companies become your source as they alleviate these problems. A phone call is all it takes to have fencing delivered and installed at your job site or event. [ Temporary Fence Rental ]

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 Ideal Applications:

  • Construction/Job Sites
  • Landscape Projects
  • Paving Projects
  • Home Construction/Renovation
  • Crowd Control
  • Special Events
  • Outdoor Retail Areas
  • Disaster Relief Zones
 
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Texas Moves Into The “Friends Zone” With Subcontractors

February 21, 2012 Leave a comment

Texas is showing a friendlier attitude toward subcontractors. The American Subcontractors Association named Texas the state with the most improved public-policy environment for construction subcontractors in 2011.

Drawing from the American Subcontractors Association’s (ASA) report, “The Policy Environment in the States,” Texas’ ranking among states rose to No. 10 from No. 29 in terms of the public-policy environment in all 50 states.
 

2010 Produces Construction Employment Decline In 36 States

January 26, 2011 5 comments

Unreal.

Thirty-six states lost construction jobs in 2010 as the industry shrank by 93,000 employees nationally, the Associated General Contractors of America reported in an analysis of state employment data released today by the Labor Department. The figures underscore the challenges facing the construction industry and echo the results of the construction industry outlook the association released yesterday.

Full Article: Construction Employment Declines in 36 States During Past Year

Categories: Construction

29 States See Construction Employment Expansion From September to Novemeber

November 29, 2010 1 comment

Associated General Contractors of America Reports:

Construction employment expanded in 29 states between September and October, while fewer people are working in construction compared to last year in 39 states, the Associated General Contractors of America reported in an analysis of state employment data released today by the Labor Department. The new figures continue a nearly year-long trend of ups and downs in construction employment as the industry performs stimulus-funded work yet grapples with broad market uncertainty.

Read Full Article: ForConstructionPros.Com

Categories: Construction, News

“Slow Progress” Is ABC 2011 Construction Industry Prediction

November 15, 2010 1 comment

Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) released its 2011 economic forecast for the U.S. commercial and industrial construction industry.  The verdict not so good…”slow progress.”

“The period of rapid improvement in spending levels did not begin in 2010, and will not happen in 2011,” said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu.

“ABC’s forecast of nonresidential construction spending for next year suggests that total spending will be 0.1 percent less than 2010 levels. Privately financed construction levels are projected to decline 0.2 percent while publicly financed construction levels are projected to be virtually flat. The bottom line is the nonresidential construction recession is largely over, but 2011 will be associated with grudgingly slow progress,” said Basu.

“To the extent that there has been recovery in nonresidential construction, it has been concentrated in segments closely tied to federal funding and the stimulus package passed in February 2009 in the midst of the recession,” Basu said. “For example, five nonresidential construction categories monitored by the U.S. Census Bureau have experienced rising spending levels from the same time last year, including conservation and development, water supply, sewage and waste disposal, and highway and street, and transportation.

“In contrast, 11 nonresidential construction sectors have experienced year-over-year declines in spending, a reflection of the lack of available capital to finance growth and investment,” said Basu. “The deepest downturns registered in construction were related to lodging, manufacturing, office and commercial. ABC expects that the lack of access to capital will continue to deter economic progress in 2011, and is forecasting 1.7 percent GDP growth next year despite ongoing federal stimulus funding and the expectation of a more expansive monetary policy.

Year-to-Date Performance: 2009 – 2010 and ABC’s 2011 Forecast

Indicator 2009 2010 2011* % Change2010-2011
Construction Put in Place – (millions, seasonally adjusted annual rate)U.S. Census Bureau 
Total Nonresidential
Lodging $25,474 $11,653 $10,814 -7.2%
Office $52,717 $36,225 $34,413 -5.0%
Commercial $55,042 $41,112 $38,645 -6.0%
Health care $45,111 $40,038 $40,338 0.7%
Educational $102,907 $87,650 $85,897 -2.0%
Power $89,405 $79,568 $83,944 5.5%
Manufacturing $58,513 $39,025 $34,342 -12.0%
Total All Industries $654,207 $557,867 $557,242 -0.1%
Private Nonresidential
Lodging $25,350 $11,051 $10,256 -7.2%
Office $37,904 $22,858 $21,716 -5.0%
Commercial $51,286 $38,393 $36,089 -6.0%
Health care $35,651 $29,843 $31,000 3.9%
Educational $16,800 $13,275 $14,500 9.2%
Power $77,622 $66,542 $71,025 6.7%
Manufacturing $57,976 $38,313 $33,715 -12.0%
Total All Industries $347,759 $259,214 $258,716 -0.2%
Public  Nonresidential
Office $14,813 $13,366 $12,698 -5.0%
Commercial $3,756 $2,719 $2,556 -6.0%
Health care $9,460 $10,195 $9,338 -8.4%
Educational $86,107 $74,375 $71,397 -4.0%
Power $11,783 $13,026 $12,919 -0.8%
Total All Industries $306,448 $298,653 $298,526 0.0%
Construction Employment (thousands, not seasonally adjusted)U.S. Department of Labor 
Nonresidential 726.2 676.2 677.2 0.2%
Residential 639.6 579.8 726.9 25.4%
Producer Price Index U.S Department of Labor 
Inputs to Construction Industries – Index Value 188.6 196.2 203.3 3.6%
Gross Domestic Product (2005 billions of dollars) U.S Department of Commerce 
Real GDP 12,880.6 13,353.4 13,587.1 1.75%

*= Data predictions by ABC Chief Economist 

…and the 2011 outlook?

The national recession that began in December 2007 ended in June 2009.  Nonresidential construction typically lags the overall performance of the U.S. economy by 12 to 24 months. Even as the broader U.S. economy entered a period of substantial decline in 2008, nonresidential construction volumes continued to expand and grew 9 percent that year. Eventually, the weakness of the overall U.S. economy, coupled with a deep financial crisis and accompanying credit crunch, wreaked havoc on all sectors of nonresidential construction. According to U.S. Census Bureau data, nonresidential construction spending declined 9 percent in 2009 and ABC projects that spending will fall 14.7 percent this year.

The good news is the period of deep decline in U.S. nonresidential construction spending is over. The bad news is this appears to represent stagnation, with overall construction volumes mired at or near bottom-of-the-cycle levels. In other words, by remaining near 2010 levels, 2011 construction spending is positioned to be nearly a quarter less than 2008 totals.

Viewed from another perspective, the expectations for 2011 represent a stark contrast from what occurred in 2010.  As a year, 2010 was a period of widely variable performance between construction segments as sectors powered by the availability of federal stimulus funds experienced growth, and privately financed activities buckled under the weight of depleted capital availability and excess supply. Next year, the variable in performance between segments will be far diminished, at least in terms of percentage changes in spending volumes.

Read Full Article From Associated Builders and Contracors here.


 
 
 

 

 

 

Categories: Construction, News

Construction Industry Unemployment Still Up Despite Addition Of 5,000 Jobs

November 9, 2010 23 comments

The Associated General Contractors of America released some puzzling math in the construction industry employment numbers.

Even as the number of people working in construction increased by 5,000 between September and October 2010, the industry’s unemployment rate rose to 17.3 percent, according to an analysis of federal employment figures released today by the Associated General Contractors of America. Temporary government investments boosted commercial construction employment, offsetting further job losses in residential construction, association officials noted.

“Despite significant help from programs like the BRAC and the stimulus, construction employment continues to lag behind much of the private sector,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “It is yet another indicator that the economy has a long way to grow before demand for new office buildings, retail centers and manufacturing facilities returns.”

Association officials noted that construction employment lagged behind other sectors of the economy. For example, while total private employment rose by 1.1 million during the past 12 months, the construction industry lost 122,000 jobs. Meanwhile, the industry’s unemployment rate is nearly double the unadjusted national rate of nine percent.

Full Press Release From: AGC of America

Categories: Construction, News

Are Infastructure Jobs The Key To A Economic Recovery?

November 2, 2010 Leave a comment

There is a belief that an investment in infrastructure will drive economic growth. 

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) and some of their partners in the construction business—have been telling Congress and the administration that if they are really serious about driving true economic recovery and job creation, infrastructure is where their focus should be.

Infrastructure investment is a proven economic engine with staying power—not only does it drive growth, it creates lasting benefits. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, 30,000 jobs are created for every $1 billion spent on infrastructure. And a modernized infrastructure system will give America the competitive edge in the global economy while improving the lives of Americans for generations to come.

Stimulus money is nearing an end; state and local budgets continue to shrink; and with a slowing recovery, the prospects for a sustained rebound in sales and employment are weakening. But the stimulus was meant to be a short-term boost. Without longer-term funding certainty, state and local governments can’t adequately plan projects.

Investing in the rebuilding and modernization of our nation’s roads, bridges, railways, runways and transit systems is a strategy that Democrats and Republicans alike should be clamoring to support. Instead, caught up in partisan rancor, Congress has let a six-year bill expire while America falls behind other nations that are building infrastructure for future competition in the global marketplace. In the short term, this will continue to cost American jobs. In the long term, it will cost us our competitive advantage—and even more jobs.

Full Article: Industry Voices: Infrastructure Jobs Can Help Rebuild Economy

Mike Rowe of “Dirty Jobs” backs the idea.

Rowe joined up with the “I Make America” campaign, an effort supported by the Association of Equipment Manufacturers, to talk about strengthening domestic manufacturing jobs.

“I am the opposite of expert, I am a good sport, I am a perpetual apprentice and the only qualifications I really have are that I’ve been to most every state and I’ve had about 300 dirty jobs,” the TV host told Yeas & Nays, calling himself a “B-list” celebrity.

Full Article: Rowe touts ‘Dirty Jobs’ in Washington

Categories: Construction, News