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Wildlife Management and Purina Mills The Perfect Marriage

November 22, 2010 Leave a comment Go to comments

It’s not what you know, it’s who you know! 

In the case of wildlife management that produces results…well…both the who and the what you know are important.

Purina Mills is the answer, they are the “who you know” and give us the “what you know” for installing and using proper techniques and principles to develop a successful management program.

The “Who You Know”

For over 100 years, Purina Mills, LLC has been America’s Leader in Animal Nutrition. Since 1926, we have been performing animal nutrition research studies at our 1,188-acre LongView Animal Nutrition Center in Gray Summit,  Missouri. We began conducting research specific to deer in the mid-1950’s, and today over 50 years later, we continue to research, formulate, test and manufacture more groundbreaking products. Our devotion to product excellence and innovation continues today with the nutritional breakthrough called AntlerMax® Technology. [read more]

Purina Mills started doing wildlife nutrition research over 50 years ago and we are committed to helping you manage the habitat and the wildlife on your property.

The “What You Know”

A properly designed and implemented supplemental feeding program will make up the gaps in nutrition that often occur when habitat does not supply all the nutrients needed for healthy and productive deer, elk, game fish and game birds.

Nutrition is one of the major factors affecting productivity of deer and elk, but it is one over which a wildlife manager can exercise considerable control. In order to make nutrition decisions which will result in a healthy, productive deer or elk herd, several factors should be considered: (1) Seasonal forage availability and quality; (2) Physiological state and nutritional requirements; (3) Number and kinds of animal species; (4) Livestock and grazing management practices; and (5) Production goals.  [read more]

Deer & Protein

There is considerable controversy regarding the percentage of dietary protein that deer should have. Many people believe that deer cannot tolerate more than 16% dietary protein and that high-protein diets are wasteful or even toxic. This simply is not true.

Research in South Texas has shown that wild deer diets at certain times of the year can be over 25% protein. Many forbs highly utilized by deer are over 30% protein. Obviously, the wild deer are unharmed by consuming these high-protein plants. Indeed, excellent antler growth years were those with superb spring forage conditions. The resulting antler growth suggests that not only were the deer not harmed by their high-protein diet, they actually utilized the protein to grow bigger antlers, indicating that higher protein is necessary for a buck to achieve his genetic potential for antler growth. [read more]

 Does Nutrition Guarantee Trophy Bucks?

If only it were that simple! Great nutrition will give your deer the opportunity to maximize their genetic potential for antler growth, but it is just one (albeit an important one) of many factors that affect antler growth. Even assuming that you are providing the best nutrition possible, other things, some within your control and some not, will affect production of trophy racks.

General health greatly influences a variety of factors that affect antler growth, such as feed intake and hormone production. If your deer are laboring under a parasite load (internal or external), clinical or sub-clinical disease challenges, or have been injured, antler growth will be negatively affected no matter how nutritious the feed because nutrition will be siphoned off to deal with these other issues. Good management must go hand-in-hand with nutrition to get optimum results. [read more]

Deer and Self-Guided Nutrition

Many people believe that deer (and other animals) somehow inherently know what they need and how much of it to eat. If you stop to think about it, you’ll quickly realize this does not make sense. If deer automatically knew what they needed, then there would be no need to formulate feeds for them; simply throw all the individual ingredients out there and let the deer “have at it”. However, it is the need for energy and the appeal of palatability that influence what a deer eats. After all, if a deer always knew what and how much to eat, it would never eat too much tasty corn and make itself sick!

Deer, like all ruminant animals, eat to meet their energy needs. The need for energy drives daily intake. If one feed is lower in energy than another, deer will eat more of the low-energy feed in order to meet their demand for calories. Likewise, deer will need less of a higher-quality, higher-energy feed. And because deer eat to meet an energy requirement, the other nutrients (fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals) must be in proportion with the energy amount so that the deer gets what it needs of all nutrients in the amount of feed that it will eat. For instance, a high-energy low-protein feed will not provide enough protein because the deer will eat only until its energy requirement is met. A high-energy, low-fiber feed (such as corn) can actually get your deer in trouble if they eat too much at once. It is important to provide a well-balanced feed that provides all the nutrient classes in proper amounts to meet your animal’s needs without causing problems. [read more]

This is just some of the great information Purina Mills provides, so get educated and implement this knowledge into your program and you will get results.  If you need more help getting your protein feeding program started here are some tips: Protein Feeding; Basics To A Succesful Supplement Feeding Program For Your Whitetail Deer Herd.

For all the information on wildlife management and proper feeds and strategies we suggest – Wildlife Innovation Through Education: Purina Mills

Click here for: Purina Mills feeds and product information or All Seasons Feeders.

Be safe this hunting season, to help you do that here are some Hunting safety tips.

What does Hunting Season mean to you? It’s not just a regulated time to hunt! Read This: Hunting Season, When Life Long Memories Are Made.

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Categories: Hunting & Wildlife
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